Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates MS. 19.2.1

| Shelfmark | Date and Language | Contents |
| Physical Description | History | Record History | Bibliography |


Shelfmark
Country:Scotland
Settlement:Edinburgh
Repository: National Library of Scotland
Idno:Advocates MS. 19.2.1
AltName:Auchinleck
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Date and Language
Date:s. xivmed
Language: English
Dialect:Scribe 1: Scribal Dialect: London/Middlesex border. Linguistic Atlas Grid Reference: 532 190, LP 6510. Scribe 2: Scribal Dialect: Gloucestershire. Linguistic Atlas Grid Reference: 412 240, LP 6940. Scribe 3 (ff. 85r-99v): Scribal Dialect: London. Linguistic Atlas Grid Reference: 526 185. Scribe 4: Scribal Dialect: not analysed. Linguistic Atlas Grid Reference: Not analysed. Scribe 5: Scribal Dialect: Essex. Linguistic Atlas Grid Reference: 557 187, LP 6350. Scribe 6: Scribal Dialect: Worcestershire. Linguistic Atlas Grid Reference: 399 238, LP 7820 (McIntosh, Samuels, and Benskin 1986, p. 88).
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Contents
A mid-fourteenth-century manuscript (c. 1331-1340) thought to have been produced in London. The manuscript contains over forty texts including The King of Tars, The Harrowing of Hell, and Speculum Gy de Warewyke.












































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Physical Description
Form:Codex
Support: Parchment
Extent:250 x 180 mm
Collation: Collation as it survives today: 1-378, 3810, 39-478.
Layout:Writing space varies depending on scribe, see Pearsall and Cunningham 1977, p. xiv. Mostly double columns with 44 lines ruled in ink. Exceptions: Battle Abbey Roll (f. 106r) written in four columns, The Legend of Pope Gregory (f.6r) and The Simonie (f.334v) written in single columns. The scribe of Speculum Gy de Warewyke (f.39r) ruled for 27 lines.
Writing: There is debate on the number scribes in the manuscript; one school argues that the manuscript was copied by six scribes (Bliss 1951; Kölbing 1884), the other that there are four scribes (Robinson 1972; Hanna 2000). For an overview see Wiggins 2004. Scribe 1 (the major scribe: ff. 1-38v; 48r-69v; 107r-167r; 201r-267v; 278r-327v) writes in a clear bookhand, which does not extend below the level of writing, although there is a certain sophistication in the final part of the ascenders, which still keep to the line of writing, but curve with a small serif (see Robinson 1972 and Hanna 2000. Characteristics: Double compartment a; round-shaped lobe, often left open; d with diagonal thick ascender curving 90 degrees from the left to the right, ending in an otiose hairline; open rounded head of g, with closed descender of squarish proportions, small serif attached to the head both in initial and final position. Straight descender with a tail on the top left side of the p, open rounded head whose shaft finishes just past the meeting point with the descender; short r is used both in medial and final position; long s used regularly, although the back stroke does not extend below the level of writing; straight backstroke of ş, open rounded head. Open w. Use of & throughout. Body height: unable to ascertain. Scribe 2 (ff. 39r-48r; 105r; 328r-334v) writing in a formal bookhand (see Bliss 1951, Mordkoff 1981), appearance is of more squarish proportions and all minims are traced separately, regular upright body height with very little variation with ascenders and descenders, influenced by Textura. Characteristics: double compartment a with often closed upper lobe; diamond-shaped d with diagonal thick ascender curving 45 degrees from left to right; closed, diamond-shape head of g, with open descender. Straight descender with a tail on the top left side of the p, closed diamond head; short r is used mainly in final position, but also in initial and occasionally medial position; long s used regularly, although the back stroke does not extend below the level of writing; long s-shaped backstroke of ş with a closed elongated head. Open w with two back strokes closed with a B-shaped head. Body height: unable to ascertain. Scribe 3 (ff. 70r-104v): writing in a cursive bookhand an 'early idiosyncratic form of Anglicana Formata' (Parkes 1969), perhaps with evidence of Chancery training (Bliss 1951). Less compact ductus and rather upright hand with some ascender above and below the level of writing. Double compartment a, upper lobe usually larger than the lower one; round lobe d with thick ascender curving 45 degrees from the left to the right, ending in an otiose hair line. Short r is used both in medial and final position; long s used regularly and the back stroke extends below the level of writing; straight backstroke of ş, open rounded head with prolonged serif attached to the back. Open w, with second back stroke closed in a B-shape. Use of & and ? throughout. Body height: unable to ascertain. Scribe 4 (list of names for the Battle Abbey Roll only ff. 105v-107r) writing in a square, formal hand, influenced by Textura script. Characteristics: open double compartment a; diamond shape lobe d with diagonal thick ascender; diamond shape g, with open descender of squarish proportions. Straight descender p, open rounded head whose shaft finishes just past the meeting point with the descender; long s used regularly, although the back stroke does not extend below the level of writing. Open w, second backstroke closed in a B shape. Body height: unable to ascertain. Scribe 5 (ff. 167r-201r) described by Bliss (1951) as 'very ugly...disjointed, and...difficult to read'. Characteristics: Double compartment a, with open lower ascender and tall upper lobe; round-shaped lobe, often left open, d with a straight thick ascender; closed rounded head of g, with closed crammed descender. Straight descender p, closed rounded head whose shaft finishes just past the meeting point with the descender; short r is used both in medial and final position; long s used regularly, although the back stroke does not extend below the level of writing; straight back stroke of ş, small rounded head. Open w. Use of & and ? throughout. Body height: unable to ascertain. Scribe 6 (ff. 268r-277v) writing in a straightforward bookhand very similar to Scribe 1, but more emphasis on ascenders and descenders even though the scribe keeps his writing to the line, some hairlines at the end of descenders such as shafts of h and ş. Characteristics: double compartment a rather upright to loop; round-shaped lobe d with small diagonal ascender extending slightly above the lobe of the letter; rounded head of g, with closed descender. Curved descender with a tail on the top left side of the ş, closed rounded head; short r is used both in medial and final position; long s used regularly, although the back stroke does not extend below the level of writing; straight back stroke of p, open rounded head. Open w, second stroke closed in a B-shape. Use of & throughout. Body height: unable to ascertain.
Decoration:Only five miniatures remain, all at the beginning of texts: ff. 7ra (The King of Tars), 72r (The Paternoster), 167rb (Reinbroun), 256vb (şe Wenche şat Loved a King), 326ra (King Richard). All appear to be by a single artist (see Robinson 1972, Mordkoff 1981, and Shonk 1985 for the view that the artist was the same as the one working on the Queen Mary Psalter, London, British Library, MS Royal 2.B.vii and Loomis 1942, for the view that the artist was inferior but knew of the work). Titles in red. First letter of each line tinted red and placed within a ruled column by scribes 1, 3 and 5 but not by scribes 2 and 4. Blue initials with red penwork flourishing, all by the same artist, eg. ff. 140 vb, 324r-v.
Binding: Not medieval. A second binding took place in the 1820s and was replaced in 1971 by HMSO Bindery, Edinburgh.
Foliation:
Additions:
Condition:A good number of folios have been lost or cut out. There are 14 stubs and 10 folios have been discovered detached from the manuscript: four folios are now kept as Edinburgh University Library MS 218; ff. 1-2 from quire 3, a fragment of The Life of Adam and Eve and ff. 3-4 from quire 48, a fragment of King Richard; four folios are held as St Andrews University Library MS PR.2065 A.15 and R.4; a fragment from quire 40, Kyng Alisaunder, and one from quire 48, King Richard; two folios are held as London, University Library, MS 593; another fragment from quire 40, Kyng Alisaunder. Many miniatures have been cut out with only five remaining. It is estimated that 17 texts have been lost from the manuscript.
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History
Origin:The evidence suggests a London production.
Provenance:Fourteenth/fifteenth century inscriptions on f. 183r: ; ; ; ; . F. 107r names of eight members of the Browne family from the fifteenth century: ; ; ; ; Elizabeth Browne; ; ; . Sixteenth-century inscriptions: f.107v, . Seventeenth-century inscription on f. 300r, is 'John'. And from the eighteenth century are (f.205r) and (f.247r).
Acquisition:Presented to the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, in 1744 by Alexander Boswell, Lord Auchinleck (1706-1782), f.1r carries an inscription recording Boswell's donation in 1744. Boswell's signature appears on a paper flyleaf with the date 1740.
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Record History
Catalogued and encoded: Rebecca Farnham, University of Birmingham, August 2003 and Orietta DaRold, University of Birmingham, June 2005. Manuscript not consulted but described with reference to Wiggins and Burnley 2003, and Pearsall and Cunningham 1977.
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Bibliography
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