hæster (OSw) hestr (OGu) hestr (ON) noun

There were numerous regulations concerning horses in various laws. In Norway, for example, the bishop was only allowed to bring with him a limited number of horses (11, in some cases 30, in summer; 6, in some cases 15, in winter) when travelling in his diocese (EidsL 32.11, 34. 3). Horses were a valid means of payment (GuL ch. 223). As articles of trade, they had to be free of flaws: they must not be blind or deaf, ruptured or restive, lame, epileptic or spastic (FrL Rgb ch. 48). A number of other requirements are listed in GuL (ch. 223) and in GL (A 34). If flaws were discovered within five days (three days in GL) after a horse was bought, the bargain could be reversed (FrL ibid.). Horses might not be used without the consent of the owner (GuL ch. 92; GL A 35). If they were injured or caused damage, this was to be compensated (GuL chs 96, 97, 147).


horse OGu GL A 6, 10, 17, 34–36
OGu GS Ch. 3
ONorw EidsL 32.11, 34.3
ONorw GuL Krb, Kp, Llb, Arb, Tfb, Mhb
OSw UL Äb, Mb, Kmb, Blb
OSw VmL Kkb, Äb, Mb, Kmb, Bb
Refs:

KLNM s.v.v. hestehandel, husdyrsygdomme, häst, jakt, kløv, kvægavl, trækdyr

Citation
  • ‘hæster’. A Lexicon of Medieval Nordic Law.

  • http://www.dhi.ac.uk/lmnl/nordicheadword/displayPage/2447
    (06/21/2024)