The Hartlib Papers

Title:Preface To Printed Tract, 'Samuel Hartlib His Legacie...Of Husbandry', [1St Edition], Ed. Samuel Hartlib.
Dating:1651
Ref:Selection of text (sig. A1-2)
Notes:Full text comprises: Preface by Samuel Hartlib (sig. A2r-v); Sir Richard Weston...his Legacie to his Sonne (sig. A3r-A4r: not included here); A large letter concerning the Defects and Remedies of English husbandry by Robert Child (pp. 1-108: not included here); Copies and Extracts of Letters written to Hartlib, various authors (pp. 109-131: not included here). Second (1652) and third (1655) editions added Annotations on the Legacy of Husbandry; An Interrogatorie relating to the Natural History of Ireland, various authors. [HDC list of The Publications of Samuel Hartlib, Turnbull: No. 37]. Second edition reissued as 'The compleat husband-man' (1659). [Turnbull list: No. 64]. Third edition reissued as 'Universal Husbandry Improved'.

[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to first edition:]
Child, Robert et al.
Wing Number: H989   Thomason Tracts: E.628(11)
SAMUEL HARTLIB | HIS | LEGACIE: | OR | An Enlargement of the Discourse of | HUSBANDRY | USED IN | BRABANT and FLANDERS; | Wherein are bequeathed to the | COMMON-WEALTH of ENGLAND more | Outlandish and Domestick Experiments and | Secrets in reference to Universall | HUSBANDRY. | [rule] | Psalme 144. verse 13, 14, 15. | That our Garners may be full, affording all manner of store, that | our Sheep may bring forth thousands, and ten thousands in our Streets. | That our Oxen may be strong to labour, that there be no com- | plaining in our Streets. | Happy is that People that is in such a Case: YEA, HAPPY is | that People whose God is the Lord. | Psalme 4. verse 6 7. | There be many that say: Who will shew us any Good? Lord, lift thou | up the light of thy Countenance upon us:- | Thou hast put gladnesse in my heart, more then in the time, that | their Corne and their Wine increased. | [rule] | Entered according to the late Act concerning Printing. | [rule] | LONDON, Printed by H. Hills, for Richard Wodenothe at | the Star under St. Peters Church in Cornhill, 1651.
4o A-R4, s2; [$2 (-A1 S2)]; 70 leaves; 33ll., 155(166)x93mm. (Clr)
pp. [8] 1-131
[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to second edition:]
Child, Robert et al.
ST: Samuel Hartlib his legacie. - Second edition.
Wing Number: H990   Wing Microfilm: 565.3
SAMUEL HARTLIB | HIS | LEGACIE: | OR AN | ENLARGEMENT | of the Discourse of | HUSBANDRY | USED IN | BRABANT & FLANDERS: | Wherein are bequeathed to the COMMON- | WEALTH of ENGLAND more, Outlandish and | Domestick Experiments and Secrets, in | reference to Universall | HUSBANDRY. | [rule] | The second Edition agumented with an APPENDIX. | [rule] | Psalme 144. verse 13, 14, 15. | That our Garners may be full, affording all manner of store, that our sheep may bring forth thousands, and | ten thousands in our Streets. | That our Oxen may be strong to labour, that there be no complaining in our streets. | Happy is that People that is in such a Case: YEA, HAPPY is that People whose God is the Lord | Psalsme 4. verse 6, 7. | There be many that say, Who will shew us any Good? | Lord, lift thou up the light of thy Countenance upon us: | Thou hast put gladnesse in my heart, more then in the time, that their Corn and their Wine increased. | [rule] | Entered according to the late Act concerning Printing. | [rule] | LONDON: | Printed by R. & W. Leybourn, for Richard Wodenothe, in Leaden-Hall | Market. next door to the Golden Hart. 1652.
4o: A-T4, V2; [$2 (-A1 02, +K,L,M,R,S,T 3; with A2 missigned B2) signed]; 78 leaves; 38ll.. 155(165)x95mm. (Blr)
pp. [8] 1-96 [97-102] 103-118 [119-156]
[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to third edition:]
Child, Robert et al.
ST: Samuel Hartlib his legacie. - Third edition.
Wing Number: H991   Wing Microfilm: 868.14
[within an ornamental frame, 170xll3mm.]
Samuel Hartlib | HIS | LEGACY | OF | HUSBANDRY | Wherein are bequeathed to the Com- | mon-wealth of ENGLAND, not onely Braband | and Flanders, but also many more Outlandish and | Domestick Experiments and Secrets (of | Gabriel Plats and others) never | heretofore divulged in reference to | Universall Husbandry. | With a Table shewing the general Contents or Sections | of the several Augmentations and enriching En- | largements in this Third Edition. | [rule] | Psal. 144. v.13, 14, 15. That our Garners may be full, affording all | manner of store, that our sheep may bring forth thousands, and ten | thousands in our streets. | That our Oxen may be strong to labour, that there be no complaining | in our streets. | Happy is that people that is in such a case: yea happy is that people | whose God is the Lord. | [rule] | London, Printed by J.M. for Richard Wodnothe. in Leaden-hall | Street next to the Golden Hart. 1655.
4o: A4, a4, B-2Q4; [$3 (-Al, A,a,Z,2A,2B,2F,2N,2Q 3; with 2K3 missigned K3) signed]; 160 leaves; 37ll., 147(162)x93mm (D1r)
pp. [16] 1-303
[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to 'The Compleat Husband-man':]
Child, Robert et al.
ST: The compleat husband-man.
Wing Number: H980   Thomason Tracts: E.979(10)
THE | COMPLEAT | Husband-man: | OR, | A discourse of the whole Art | OF | HUSBANDRY; | BOTH | Forraign and Domestick. | Wherein many rare and most hidden se- | crets, and experiments are laid open to | the view of all, for the enriching | of these NATIONS. | Unto which is added | A Particular discourse of the Naturall History | and Hubandry of IRELAND. | [rule] | By SAMUEL HARTLIB, Esq. | [rule] | LONDON, | Printed and are to be sold by Edward Brewster at the Crane in | Paul's Church-yard. 1659.
4o: A-T4; V2; [$2 (-A1 02, +K,L,M,R,S,T 3; with A2 missigned B2) signed]; 78 leaves
pp. [8] 1-96 [97-102] 103-118 [119-156]
[Long-Title and Bibliographical description to 'Universal Husbandry Improved':]
Child, Robert et al.
ST: Universal Husbandry Improved
British Library: Cup 408. s8.
Universal Husbandry | IMPROVED, | OR, DIVERS | RARE and CHOICE | EXPERIMENTS | AND | SECRETS | Relating to all Kind of Husbandry | GARDNING & PLANTING. | With divers Rarities of Gabriel Platt & others, | both Forreign and Domestick. | Now Divulged for the Enrichment of the Kingdom of England. | The Heads of the Particullars are contained in | the seven next leafes. | [rule] | By that laborious Improver and Refiner of our | English Husbandry | Mr. SAMUEL HARTLIB. | [rule] | LONDON, | Printed for R.H. and are to be Sold in St. Pauls Church-yard.
4o: A4, a4, B-2Q4; [$3 (-Al. A,a,Z,2A,2B,2F,2N,2Q 3; with 2K3 missigned K3) signed]; 160 leaves
pp. [16] 1-303

[Selection of text begins:]
[sig. A1r]
                    SAMUEL HARTLIB
                         HIS
                    LEGACIE:
                         OR
               An Enlargement of the Discourse of
                    HUSBANDRY
                    USED IN
               BRABANT and FLAUNDERS;
               Wherein are bequeathed to the
               COMMON-WEALTH of ENGLAND more
                Outlandish and Domestick Experiments and
                 Secrets in reference to Universall
                    HUSBANDRY.
______________________________________________
                    Psalme 144. verse 13, 14, 15.
     That our Garners may be full, affording all manner of store, that our Sheep may bring forth thousands, and ten thousands in our Streets.
     That our Oxen may be strong to labour,----that there be no complaining in our Streets.
     Happy is that People thta is in such a Case: YEA, HAPPY is that People whose God is the Lord.
                    Psalme 4. verse 6,7.
     There be many that say: Who will shew us any Good? Lord, life thou up the light of thy Countenance upon us:.
     Thou hast put gladnesse in my heart, more then in the time, that their Corneand their Wine increased.
                         [MSS: May 10th]
______________________________________________
          Entered according to the late Act concerning Printing.
______________________________________________
LONDON, Printed by H. Hills, for Richard Wodenothe at the Star under St. Peters Church in Cornwill, 1651.
[sig. A2r]
                    To the Reader.
Courteous Reader,
   THe Discourse which I did formerly publish concerning the Brabant-Husbandry, was somewhat imperfect, nor was the Author thereof then knowne unto me; but since I have learned who the Author was, I have also lighted upon a more perfect Copy, which I intend to offer to the Publique in a Second Edition; that such as have entertained that first offer with liking and acceptance, may finde the benefit of a clearer and fuller satisfaction in that which shall further be imparted unto them. And to the end that Ingenuity and Industry may want no incouragement, in the meane time accept of these Enlargements upon the same Subject; wherein you will find divers other wayes, and no lesse (if not more) profitable, then that which was left by Sir RICHARD WESTON (the Author of the Brabant-Husbandry) as a Legacy to his Sonnes: Whose Introduction to that Discourse, I have here premised to this, to bespeake thee in his words to his Sonnes, and to gain thy affections more fully to these wayes of advantaging both thy selfe and the Publique. And I could wich, that God would put it in the heart of those Worthies that manage the Publique Trust, that by their Influence and Authority, these and such like Meanes of Industry, may not be left wholly to the uncertaine, disorderly and lazy undertakings of private men, so as not to have an eye over them, and over that which in their proceedings doth so mainly appeare to be a Publique Concernment. Therefore let us all joine to intreate and petition them, that in order to the Publique and General Welfare of this Common-wealth, these two things at least may be thought upon and setled.
   1. In respect of the known untowardnes of the Major part [catchword: of]
[sig. A2v]
of the People; who being wonderfully wedded to old customes, are not easily won to any new course, though never so much to their owne profit, that two or more fit Persons of approved skill and integrity may be made Publique Stewards or Surveyors; one of the Husbandry, the other of the Woods of this Common-wealth, and impowered to oversee and take care of the preservation of what is, and by all good improvementto procure and provide for what is wanting to the present age: and (except some such Expedients be used) it is more then likely will be wanting to suceeding ages.
   2. That according to the usual custome in Flaunders, a Law may be made of letting & hiring Leaves upon Improvement; where the manner is, That the Farmer convenanteth on his part, to improve the land to such or such a greater Rent, by an orderly and excellent management of Husbandry, as well as Building. The Landlord on the other side covenanteth on his part, as the expiration or the said Lease, to give so many years purchase of the Improvement (according to the agreement) which is 3. or 4. years or some times more, or to give out of it such a parcel or moity of Ground. As if land formerly going for 6.s. an Acre, be upon Improvement worth 10.s. or 13.s.4.d. an Acre, more or lesse, according to the agreement. It it please God to blesse these Motions, and that accordingly the National Husbandry of this Common-wealth be improved; we may hope through Gods blessing to see better dayes, and to be able to beare necessary and Publique burdens with more ease to our selves, and benefit to Humane Society then hitherto we could attaine unto. Which more and more to advance, in reference to a Publique and Universal Interest, as subordinate to Higher things; & which though lesse visible and sensible, are more permanent, and to truly Rational and Spiritual Husbandmen as perceptible, shall be the uncessant prayers and endeavours of
                         Thy faithful Servant
                         SAMUEL HARTLIB.